Sandeep Kishore

Sandeep Kishore is a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and co-chair of the Young Professionals Chronic Disease Network (YP-CDN), a global network of 400 young professionals from 50 countries committed to the equitable prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as a social justice issue. He seeks to leverage lateral thinking and trans-disciplinary approaches at universities worldwide, with the goal of preparing and cultivating the next generation of young leaders to tackle health challenges of the 21st century. In this capacity, he served as a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly in 2011. His work has been featured in the popular press (Scientific American, The Huffington Post and The Scientist), as well as in scholarly journals and textbooks including the Nature Reviews series and PLoS Medicine. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University, where his dissertation focused on the evolution of malaria parasitism in humans and for which he was awarded the national Raymond W. Sarber award for most outstanding graduate student in microbiology. He is a graduate of Duke University (B.S.) and Oxford University (M.Sc.), and is the first The Lancet awardee for community service. He is a Fellow at MIT’s Dalai Lama Center for Ethics & Transformative Values and a recipient of the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans. He is returning to complete his medical training at Cornell’s medical college in 2012.

You say you want a revolution? (Sandeep Kishore)

Science Kit for Sandeep Kishore

Dear all,

Here it is, my Science Kit!

See http://bit.ly/Ica0xK for the 'Causes of the Causes' Challenge. It is a living document, a curation of examples and lessons learned from students and faculty globally on integrating non-biomedical determinants into medical training! Please add on to it.

See http://bit.ly/pDdnqM for a 'Youth Manifesto on Non-Communicable Diseases'

See http://bit.ly/tYrzDq for a student-faculty paper on 'Preparing the University Community for 21st Century Public Health Needs."