Achieving More Medical Innovation, More Affordably

New medical tests, treatments and devices are often very expensive when first introduced. Eventually, market forces bring the prices down. However, since most patients don’t pay for healthcare out of their own pockets, they don’t want to wait.

Patients disproportionately demand the latest, best medical products and services immediately — often, even if the demanded good is of marginal relevance to their condition. Leaving out questions of universal access and rationing, how can we make more medical innovations more affordable, more quickly, for more people?

Which proven strategies from Silicon Valley, the Moon landings, the Manhattan Project or other successful models could be applied effectively to achieving faster, yet less costly innovation in health and medicine?

Watch Live Event Recasts: Event 1  |  Event 2

Meet the Challenge Team

The Challenge Team Members are leaders in their fields and reflect multi-disciplinary, passionate and thoughtful perspectives for the Challenge they represent.
Challenge Team members participate in the discussion held by the Great Challenges community, and will be creating responses to questions submitted by the community on the discussion tab.

  - look for this icon throughout the Great Challenges discussions. It is used to identify comments posted by the Challenge Team members.

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Margaret Anderson
Executive Director, FasterCures
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Margaret Anderson is Executive Director of FasterCures/The Center for Accelerating Medical Solutions, an action tank working to improve the medical research system – to speed up the time it takes to get important new medicines from discovery to patients. She defines the organization's strategic priorities and positions on key issues, develops its programmatic portfolio and manages its operations. In her role, she helps bring sectors together to facilitate collaboration and ensures policies are in place to promote medical progress. 

In 2011, the Clinical Research Forum recognized her with an award for leadership in public advocacy, a testament to the positive impact of her leadership and FasterCures' vital role in improving the medical research system. She is president of the Alliance for a Stronger FDA, and co-chairs the eHealth Initiative's Council on Data and Research. She also is a board member of the Council for American Medical Innovation, the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research, the Prostate Cancer Foundation Government Affairs Committee, and the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Drug Discovery, Development and Translation.

Achieving better, cheaper, faster medical solutions requires traditional and nontraditional partners to come together to innovate, collaborate, and get things done. We know that the brightest, most transformative idease surface when disciplines, sectors, and industries intersect. We also know that if each sector works together and operates at peak performance, we can save time in the development of medical solutions. And by saving time, save lives. This challenge is at the core of what we do at FasterCures.

Margaret Anderson
Executive Director, FasterCures
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Stacey Chang
Associate Partner and Director, Health & Wellness Practice at IDEO
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Stacey is an Associate Partner at IDEO and directs IDEO’s Healthcare practice. Working across several IDEO offices since 1995, he has led efforts creating new offerings in healthcare therapies and services, products and devices, research, and market strategy targeting healthcare professionals and consumers alike. Clients within the healthcare industry range from healthcare delivery institutions to major pharmaceutical and device manufacturers and medical technology start-ups. In his current role at IDEO, his responsibility centers on helping clients understand their unique contribution to the broader healthcare ecosystem and helping them develop breakthrough offerings that are as beneficial for their end users as they are for their bottom lines.

In addition to his work at IDEO, Stacey has founded financial services software companies, led instrument platform development for surgical robotic systems, and counts among his experience, forays into automotive design, corporate research and academic teaching. He also actively mentors several technology start-ups in Silicon Valley. In all his engagements, Stacey is passionate about the application of design thinking and developing technology towards the betterment of the human condition.

Stacey was named to Medical Device and Diagnostics Industry magazine’s “40 under 40” list of medical technology innovators in 2012.
We engage every stakeholder in the healthcare ecosystem through the work we do at IDEO – government, payers, healthcare delivery systems, pharmaceutical and device manufacturers, clinicians, patients and caregivers.  We are asked routinely to help our clients unearth new insights, design new solutions, and then shepherd those ideas to realization in global markets. That breadth of experience grants us access to an unending stream of new ideas, but has also honed our instinct for what will deliver true impact in healthcare. We are eager to bring that perspective to bear in the pursuit of medical innovation.
Stacey Chang
Associate Partner and Director, Health & Wellness Practice at IDEO
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Chas Roades
Chief Research Officer, The Advisory Board Company
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Chas Roades is a senior leadership team member and Chief Research Officer of The Advisory Board Company, where he leads a staff of over 150.  He studies market forces and trends driving U.S. healthcare and directs research into ongoing changes in the organization and management of American medicine.  

An author of over 40 landmark strategy publications for hospitals and health systems, Mr. Roades is a nationally recognized speaker and an authority on the most pressing issues for healthcare CEOs, including emerging reimbursement and incentive models, the intersection of national health policy and delivery system strategy, hospital physician alignment, and the future of health care, such as the industry’s potential for vertical consolidation.

Mr. Roades was an engagement manager at McKinsey & Company, a management consultancy.  In this role, he was responsible for leading engagements on strategy, organization, and operations for Fortune 500 clients. Previously, Mr. Roades served for five years as an officer in the United States Air Force.  He also serves on a number of nonprofit and governmental advisory boards.

A Stanford MBA, Mr. Roades also holds a master’s degree from Stanford, and a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Virginia.
I bring 15 years of management consulting and research experience to the project, including 13 years working directly with hospital and health system senior executives and boards of directors to create strategies, improve operations, elevate clinical performance, and enhance value. As Chief Research Officer, my role is to ensure our research agenda aligns with the “up at night” issues of our 3,000+ provider members; my perspective on the issues the Great Challenges program addresses will be heavily informed by my understanding of those issues.
Chas Roades
Chief Research Officer, The Advisory Board Company
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Halle Tecco
CEO, Rock Health
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Halle Tecco is the Co-Founder & CEO of RockHealth, the first startup accelerator devoted exclusively to health companies. Tecco recognized the need and potential for startups in the digital health space while working at Apple's App Store, covering the health and medical vertical. Previously, she founded Yoga Bear, a national nonprofit that provides yoga to the cancer community in hospitals and at over 200 partner studios.

Tecco was named as one of “12 Entrepreneurs Reinventing Healthcare” by CNN, one of “15 Women to Watch in Tech” by Inc. Magazine, and was a L’Oreal “Woman of Worth” Honoree. Tecco has written for Harvard Business School Publishing, Stanford Social Innovation Review,Glamour.com and ForbesWoman. She has a Bachelor of Science degree from Case Western Reserve University and a Master of Business Administration from Harvard Business School.
I approach the challenge of "Achieving Medial Innovation, More Affordably" from the perspective of supporting health technology entrepreneurs through my position as co-founder & CEO of the healthcare startup incubator, Rock Health.  I want to explore how we can bring together diverse minds to collaboratively solve problems, work with the healthcare system to pilot and implement effective solutions, and ultimately leverage technology to reduce inefficiencies and improve health outcomes for all.
Halle Tecco
CEO, Rock Health
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Don Rucker
Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Siemens
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Don Rucker, M.D., was the first full-time Emergency Department attending at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and co-developed the first Windows-based electronic medical record.  At Siemens, Rucker developed the award-winning Computerized Physician Order Entry system, and served two terms on the Board of Commissioners of the Certification Commission for Healthcare Information Technology.  He is active in many Congressional and federal agency health care policy discussions concerning the Siemens diagnostic product and information systems portfolios. 
US healthcare needs innovation. It drives new treatments and simply better care. It is new tests, new medicines, new procedures, new services and new delivery systems. However, while the value of technology is rising and its costs are plummeting elsewhere, technology costs in healthcare continue to rise. How can we get the information explosion and price reductions underlying today's smart devices to change healthcare? With over half of healthcare spending now in the hands of the federal government, can public policy accelerate this effort?
Don Rucker
Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Siemens
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Diego Miralles, MD
Head, Janssen Research & Development West Coast Research Center, Janssen Healthcare Innovation and J&J Innovation Center, California
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What excites Diego Miralles the most about the future of healthcare is that he knows the best is yet to come. Through his work leading various groups in the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, Diego is working to drive healthcare into that bright future. As the head of Janssen Healthcare Innovation, Diego oversees initiatives that will improve the consumer healthcare experience, achieve better outcomes and save healthcare dollars. Diego leads J&J’s California Innovation Center, which provides direct (one-stop) access to J&J for local and regional scientists, entrepreneurs, and businesses looking for partnerships. Diego also serves as head of Janssen’s West Coast Research Center.

Diego has a background of over 13 years in the healthcare industry and 12 years in the hospital and academic worlds, including extensive clinical research experience, mostly in the HIV/AIDS space. He serves as an adjunct full professor in the Pharmacology department at the University of California, San Diego and is on the Board of the Rady Children’s Hospital. Diego graduated from the University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine in 1986.

As a leader of multiple innovation groups within the world’s largest global healthcare company, Johnson & Johnson, I have many opportunities to engage with and contribute to medical innovation. As head of Janssen Healthcare Innovation (JHI), I am overseeing a talented team tasked with developing integrated solutions that empower consumers by applying new technologies and novel approaches to optimizing healthcare delivery so that we can lower costs and improve outcomes for patients.  In leading J&J’s newly announced California regional innovation center and Janssen Labs (home to over 18 start-up and entrepreneurial healthcare companies), I am forming relationships with an amazing network of healthcare entrepreneurs who share the vision of transforming healthcare. I am looking forward to applying my passion and expertise to the Achieving More Medical Innovation, More Affordably Great Challenge.

Diego Miralles, MD
Head, Janssen Research & Development West Coast Research Center, Janssen Healthcare Innovation and J&J Innovation Center, California

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Challenge Team Perspectives

We selected 10 questions out of the many submitted by our Great Challenges Community, to be addressed by each of our Team members.
See their responses and perspectives, below.

Question 1

What are the top 10 contributing factors to this Great Challenge (i.e. obstacles to “Promoting Medical Innovation”)?
Response from Chas Roades
  1. Inadequate investment in and oversight of the U.S. primary educational system, including science and math curriculum
  2. Lack of a meaningful and objective way to assess the effectiveness of healthcare technologies and allow purchasers to make informed decisions (although the hope is that the comparative effectiveness institute could change that)
  3. Payment systems in the private and public sector that do not reward quality or value
  4. Patent laws that stymie invention by allowing manufactures to game the system
  5. Congressional budgeting processes that force law makers to focus on short to mid-term changes in spending (i.e., 10 years or less) when dealing with long term, systemic problem
  6. Lack of adequate resources to oversee and police devices and pharmaceuticals at the FDA
  7. Loss of "public good" ethos in U.S. research universities
  8. The tension between information and privacy 
  9. The lack of effective standardization of information systems.  In "The Healing of America" TR Reid describes systems in other countries where each individual has a smart card that includes all of their relevant health care information - and all providers use the same basic technology to read from and write to those cards.  The inability of every provider to have access to this complete record is a major stumbling block
  10. Health illiteracy: too many adults lack even basic information about health and wellness, meaning that the patients themselves are not sufficiently engaged in improving their own care.

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